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About Traditional Art / Hobbyist Member DeeAnnFemale/United States Recent Activity
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Something hilarious I'm sure by Trigonography
Something hilarious I'm sure
Just playing around, trying out some new techniques.

Used this senshistock.deviantart.com/art… as a pose reference. Thank you, SenshiStock
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Just a curious little call out to those adults with ADD/ADHD... what do you do to deal with it? 

I was diagnosed with ADHD three years ago. I've learned to do several things to help handle the troubles I have with day-to-day living. Some of it I learned to do before I was diagnosed, some of it I figured out after. 


    1. I keep a bowl on my desk for my "pocket monsters" (i.e. keys, wallet, cell phone). My pocket monsters aren't always there, but it's a place to look first, since I find that I don't like to sit down for a long time with stuff in my pockets, and a bowl makes for a convenient place to put them. (This works less well in the winter, when my monsters live in my jacket.)

    2. I use nag-ware to keep me aware of upcoming responsibilities and appointments. While I was in college, this was a godsend. I was almost never late for class once I started doing this, because my phone/computer/anything else attached would ping me with a 20-minute head start. That's enough time to stuff my homework in my bag, sprint across campus, barge into the wrong classroom, and find my way to the correct room with about 5 minutes to spare. Of course, this means that about 25% of the time I get strange looks because my phone will make a noise and I'll shout, "ALL RIGHT, JEEZ, STOP NAGGING ME!" It's a small price to pay.

    3. I don't tell people about large projects unless they're actually involved in it. I find that if I get people's expectations up, then I feel overwhelmed by the project, and I get increasingly anxious about finishing it satisfactorily, and then I find ways to procrastinate. If I don't mention that I'm working on a thing, then the thing becomes my tool for procrastinating other things. (90% of my life is outsmarting myself.)

    4. When it comes to housework, I try to have the other people in my house doing work at the same time. It's hard to dawdle over the dishes while my husband is cleaning the cat's box or doing laundry. It's a way of rewarding myself; if I can finish my tasks before my family has finished theirs, then I can rest for an extra three minutes! (I also try to pawn off the dishes to people that don't hate washing dishes. I have had long, heated negotiations with my brothers, offering to do two or three chores if they'll just take care of the dishes.)

    5. I try to anticipate problems with my ability to hold information in my head and my problems with details. I love details, but I'm almost blind to them because there are a lot of details out there. At work, I keep an "Anti-Goof Device" with me. My Anti-Goof Device is just a plain notebook and a pen, where I write down the details of a task and check it with my supervisor to make sure I didn't miss anything important. I do this even if the task is given to me in written form. This slows me down noticeably, but it basically eliminates stupid mistakes. (I amused my boss and coworkers by putting OSHA-style use instructions on the back of the Device, telling them to whack me over the head with it if they see me failing to give proper attention to detail. There's some non-ADD-centered advice for you-- people respond well to comic self-deprecation, and are more inclined to forgive mistakes if you own them and visibly try to resolve them.)

    6. Whenever possible, I work with music playing. It's easier to drown out distracting sounds when there's music; it drowns out people talking, it drowns out the AC, it drowns out the monologues in my head and gives my restless brain something harmless to chew on when it's looking for new stimulation. 


Anyway, those are some of the things I do. They're not one-size-fits-all, just stuff that seems to work for me. What do other people do to keep their ADHD from turning everything into a baffling mess? 
I've had a number of discussions with friends and family about what talent is. People tell me that I have a talent for drawing, but I don't think I've ever really felt talented. I mean, it's not like I was born being able to draw. I recently went through some old sketchbooks and college notebooks, and let me tell you, I was deeply embarrassed. I was embarrassed by the quality of the work, the content, the style, the methods I used. I look at some stuff from 2010 and I think, "Oh my Lord, what was I doing? All of these people look like noodles!" Going further back, I see a lot of Sonic the Hedgehog fanart, and I ask myself what I found so compelling, seeing as I never really liked Sonic the Hedgehog to begin with, except the bit in Sonic Adventure 2 where there was a space station and lab experiments and the possibility of many sordid things that the player didn't get to hear about because they were busy following the badly-acted and awkwardly-animated exploits of Brooding-Troubled-Loner Egotist and Desperately-Trying-To-Be-Cool Egotist. But I admit, I drew fanart. I drew a lot of it-- Sonic, Doctor Who, The Lord of the Rings, The X-Men, the whole nine yards. This was important, though it was an awkward and embarrassing time that I might call artistic puberty if I didn't think it sounded kind of gross. It taught me different drawing styles, gave me something which I thought was character creation but was actually practice for drawing people. 

This, I think, is what talent is. My "talent" for drawing is not the ability to draw; it's the will or the drive to draw, even when it's embarrassing, when it's terrible, even when I ought to be doing something else. It's the desire to keep practicing. Anyone can draw well. It's not hard to train the muscles to do so. What's makes one person's "talents" different from another's is not their ability to do a thing, but their desire to do it. I have no musical talent, or so I tell people, but in truth I just don't get much satisfaction for performing, practicing, or theorizing about sound. I have no talent for programming, or so I say, but I have made programs and if that gave me some significant satisfaction, I would have kept on doing it and become a programmer. I often say I have no talent for math, but I teach it, and with a little effort I can manage to not embarrass myself, but I don't really enjoy it and I try to find ways to make it take less time. But I do enjoy drawing. Nowadays, I often feel less embarrassed when look at something I drew. It's finally become something of a skill, although I still think I have a long way to go before I'm really happy with the results.

That's my point, really. Maybe talent is just the drive to practice something. I'm not even convinced that you're born with it. I wonder what would have happened if my parents and grandparents had not encouraged me to draw, keeping crayons and paper and glitter around so that they could do their Important Adult Things without me pestering them. Maybe I'd still enjoy drawing. But I think I probably would be even less inclined to show the results than I am now. It's just a thing I do for my own satisfaction. And maybe that, at heart, is what talent is: it's what you call it when doing something gives you some kind of satisfaction. Sometimes, it leads to actual skill.
I've had a number of discussions with friends and family about what talent is. People tell me that I have a talent for drawing, but I don't think I've ever really felt talented. I mean, it's not like I was born being able to draw. I recently went through some old sketchbooks and college notebooks, and let me tell you, I was deeply embarrassed. I was embarrassed by the quality of the work, the content, the style, the methods I used. I look at some stuff from 2010 and I think, "Oh my Lord, what was I doing? All of these people look like noodles!" Going further back, I see a lot of Sonic the Hedgehog fanart, and I ask myself what I found so compelling, seeing as I never really liked Sonic the Hedgehog to begin with, except the bit in Sonic Adventure 2 where there was a space station and lab experiments and the possibility of many sordid things that the player didn't get to hear about because they were busy following the badly-acted and awkwardly-animated exploits of Brooding-Troubled-Loner Egotist and Desperately-Trying-To-Be-Cool Egotist. But I admit, I drew fanart. I drew a lot of it-- Sonic, Doctor Who, The Lord of the Rings, The X-Men, the whole nine yards. This was important, though it was an awkward and embarrassing time that I might call artistic puberty if I didn't think it sounded kind of gross. It taught me different drawing styles, gave me something which I thought was character creation but was actually practice for drawing people. 

This, I think, is what talent is. My "talent" for drawing is not the ability to draw; it's the will or the drive to draw, even when it's embarrassing, when it's terrible, even when I ought to be doing something else. It's the desire to keep practicing. Anyone can draw well. It's not hard to train the muscles to do so. What's makes one person's "talents" different from another's is not their ability to do a thing, but their desire to do it. I have no musical talent, or so I tell people, but in truth I just don't get much satisfaction for performing, practicing, or theorizing about sound. I have no talent for programming, or so I say, but I have made programs and if that gave me some significant satisfaction, I would have kept on doing it and become a programmer. I often say I have no talent for math, but I teach it, and with a little effort I can manage to not embarrass myself, but I don't really enjoy it and I try to find ways to make it take less time. But I do enjoy drawing. Nowadays, I often feel less embarrassed when look at something I drew. It's finally become something of a skill, although I still think I have a long way to go before I'm really happy with the results.

That's my point, really. Maybe talent is just the drive to practice something. I'm not even convinced that you're born with it. I wonder what would have happened if my parents and grandparents had not encouraged me to draw, keeping crayons and paper and glitter around so that they could do their Important Adult Things without me pestering them. Maybe I'd still enjoy drawing. But I think I probably would be even less inclined to show the results than I am now. It's just a thing I do for my own satisfaction. And maybe that, at heart, is what talent is: it's what you call it when doing something gives you some kind of satisfaction. Sometimes, it leads to actual skill.

deviantID

Trigonography
DeeAnn
Artist | Hobbyist | Traditional Art
United States
I'm a student of Ceramic Engineering. I enjoy math and science, although I'm not necessarily good at math. I like to draw people, and I like science fiction that plausibly plays by the rules of the real world, or at least can fast-talk the referee. I have three dogs and a cockatiel, and when I'm not studying for school or drawing or being otherwise artistic, I practice martial arts and research survival techniques. I am the world's worst chess player. I'm a follower of Christ, and through my engineering and my art I seek to do God's will.
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:iconcaen-n:
Caen-N Featured By Owner Dec 11, 2012
HAPPY BIRTHDAY! :cake:
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:icontrigonography:
Trigonography Featured By Owner Dec 11, 2012  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
:D Thank you! Cake all around!
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:iconarany-photography:
Arany-Photography Featured By Owner Apr 28, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
Thanks for the :+fav:! :wave:
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:icontrigonography:
Trigonography Featured By Owner Apr 30, 2012  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
You're welcome! :D
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:iconknivesandroses:
knivesandroses Featured By Owner Jan 2, 2012
Happy New Year Trig.... I hope this year brings you lots of fun.
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:icontrigonography:
Trigonography Featured By Owner Jan 3, 2012  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Thank you, I'll certainly try! I hope you have a lot to grin about this year.
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:iconcaen-n:
Caen-N Featured By Owner Dec 11, 2011
hey happy birthday! :)

=D
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:icontrigonography:
Trigonography Featured By Owner Dec 11, 2011  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Hey, thank you! :D
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:iconvepsart:
VEPSART Featured By Owner Nov 22, 2011  Student
Thank you for the fave! ;)
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:icontrigonography:
Trigonography Featured By Owner Nov 23, 2011  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
:) You're quite welcome.
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